The Latest

2020-21 FY Values-Driven Budget

When creating our 2020-21 fiscal year budget, Five Oaks Museum put our money behind our ethics by categorizing our expenses by our museum’s five values: Body, Land, Truth, Justice, and Community.

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2019-20 School Year Programs Reach

Despite a tumultuous academic year that included an organizational overhaul (2019) and a global pandemic (2020), our learning programs engaged over 1,400 people before we closed our museum doors on March 14th!

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DISplace Call For Stories

Five Oaks Museum invites submissions from families and individuals who have moved between Hawai’i and the Pacific Northwest to share the story of their life in this region.

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DISplace Call For Art

Five Oaks Museum invites submissions from visual artists working in any medium who have familial ties to the Hawaiian Islands, and are living and working in the Pacific Northwest.

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DISplace

Opening November 12, 2020

DIS/PLACE will shine light on the widely unknown connection between Hawai‘i, the Pacific Northwest, and the communities that continue to flow between these two regions.

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Social Media Takeover: RaiNE Brabender

RaiNE Brabender, participating artist in Gender Euphoria, shares their self-portraiture process and how they connect with self-love, their senses and body, comfort, and home through their artwork. This takeover took place from July 20 to July 25, 2020.

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Social Media Takeover: Liberty Morey

Liberty Morey, participating artist in Gender Euphoria, shares their zines, a collage project, trans artists who inspire them, and how they think of the body as a landscape. This takeover took place from July 6 to July 11, 2020.

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July 2020 Newsletter

Inside this issue: Gender Euphoria show opening and programs, a new chapter of This IS Kalapuyan Land, and community updates

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Five Oaks and the Fourth of July

In the early years of U.S. settlement in the Pacific Northwest, two landmark Fourth of July celebrations took place at the Five Oaks historic site and became a source of both pride and pain.

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