This IS Kalapuyan Land:

Carol Haskins (Grand Ronde)

Carol Haskins (Grand Ronde) beads intricate animal motifs and cultural symbols into her work as a master beadworker and teacher.

Beaded Yoke

Beads, fabric, stone, glass, thread, shells.

What is the significance of the beaded yoke, and why does it say “Guam” on it?

Haskins’ father is from Grand Ronde, and he was in the military. He met her mother when he was stationed in Guam, a Pacific island under U.S. miltary occupation. Haskins’ father asked her to make this yoke when her mother passed away. A yoke is the beaded top portion of a dress. It took her three years to complete. Some of the diamond patches are made by important women in her life, including Haskins’ sister Diane Smith. The charms on the back of the yoke display the womens’ names.

Bear Bone Knife and Sheath

Bone, leather, beads, metal.

Skull Cap

Dentalium, abalone, leather, thread.

 

Dentalium Necklace

Dentalium, beads, leather, thread.

What is the significance of dentalia shells? How does Haskins bead her work, and how did she combine multiple beaded components to make the yoke? 

Find out in this video beading tutorial and interview with Carol Haskins.

Bear Claw Braid Clips & Hair Clip

Beads, leather, shells, thread, metal clip.

“Teaching beadwork in Native community creates a sense of family; carrying on connections like the ancestors did.” 

– Carol Haskins

Men’s Traditional Necklace

Bone, beads, abalone, leather, thread, metal.

Women’s Necklace

Abalone, beads, metal, thread.

Turtle Hair Clip

Turtle shell, beads, thread, metal clip.

Beaded Portrait

Beads, thread

Bear Hair Clip

Beads, thread, metal clip.

Hawk Feather Fan

Hawk Feathers, leather, thread.

Meet the Artist:

Carol Haskins (Grand Ronde, Chinook, Klamath, Klickitat, Molalla, Wasco, French Canadian Native) was a cultural instructor for Grand Ronde for 15 years with co-instructor and mentor Colleen Payne, teaching how to make regalia (outfits for Powwow) and beadwork alongside cultural stories. Haskins is in her 14th year tutoring in ASL at Mount Hood Community College. She has also worked at A Bead Source (owned by Dixie Thompson, in Portland on 158th and Division) for over 20 years as another way to stay connected to the Native community, where that store is deeply rooted. Her daughter, Nicole Haskins, is also an artist.